1. Vocabulary about money

1. Vocabulary about money

Tim wants more *pocket money.

* money children and teenagers get from their parents each week.

Main practice:
  vocabulary about money
Revision:             ago  -  nowadays  -  more than enough 

Vocabulary
raise (noun) - an increase in pay; something is made larger or greater, i.e.
  • I'm going to ask my boss for a raise

expenses - amount of money spent on needs, i.e.
  • Yes, I'll come and speak at your meeting, just pay my travel expenses, please. 

to waste - to consume or spend uselessly, i.e.
  • He wasted all the money on taxis and taking his friends to expensive restaurants.
  • The film was terrible, seeing it was a waste of time. 

to lend - to let someone use something that will be returned to you later , i.e.
  • She didn't have any money so I lent her some. 

to borrow - to use someone else's property or receive money to be paid back later
- Can I borrow your dictionary, please? (Note: Can you lend me your dictionary, please?)
- Sure, but let me have it back before next lesson. 

to pay back -to repay money that has been lent, i.e.
  • Yes, you can borrow twenty pounds, but please pay me back by the weekend.

to go up
- to increase, especially costs / prices, i.e.

  • The cost of living has really gone up this year.


Conversation

Tim gives his father several reasons why he should get an increase in his pocket money.

Complete the sentences.


Tim:  Dad, isn't it time for a in my pocket money?

Bill:   But we put it up at Christmas, Tim, and that's only four months ago.

Tim:  I know, but my expenses have .

Bill:   Such as?

Tim:  Well, I'm in a band now and I need to buy things, like guitar strings. And
            I've got a girlfriend.

Bill:   Girls pay for themselves nowadays.

Tim:  I know, but it's Jane's birthday soon and I can't to buy her a present.

Bill:   Tim, me and your mother give you twelve pounds a week, have you
            any of that?

Tim:  Yes, nearly fifty pounds.

Bill:   Well, that's more than enough to buy Jane a present.

Tim:  I know, but I'm for a new guitar.

Bill:   Which is more important, the guitar or Jane's present?  

Tim:  That's not a fair question. Come on,  Dad, I'm in a band and I need
            a good guitar.

Bill:   Your mother and I are paying for you to go on the school skiing trip to
            France and that a lot of money.

Tim:  Okay, well, can you and Mum  me some money so I can get Jane
           a present?

Bill:  If you want to money you have to say when you'll .

Tim:  Well, it's my birthday in two months and Grandma and Grandad will give
            me money, so can I then? 

Bill:   And how much do you want to ?

Tim:  Um, could we say fifty?


Exercise

Complete the sentences.

saving up  -  afford  -  borrow  -  pay you back  -  pay me back  -  gone up  -  raised  -  lend  -  cost 

Remember: We borrow something from someone else. We lend something to someone
                         else.

1.  - Could I twenty pounds, I can next week?
     - Well, I'll you the money but only if you can
        tomorrow.

2.  Wow, these cinema tickets are expensive!  With our restaurant
     dinner this evening is going to us a lot of money.

3.   I'm for my holiday. We're going skiing in France.

4.   I wish I could a new car.

5.  My boss has my salary, now I can to buy a new
     computer.

6.  The train fares have , I think I'll take a bus.